Weller WLC100 40-Watt Soldering Station

Weller WLC100 40-Watt Soldering Station

  • High performance analog soldering station produces up to 900° F to handle many soldering projects
  • Variable power control dial adjusts power from 5 watts to 40 watts for accuracy
  • Quality, lightweight pencil iron with cushioned foam grip provides extended comfort during long-term soldering projects
  • Includes: a Weller certified ST3 iron-plated tip for long life and consistent performance, a built-in soldering holder to safely rest your pencil, and a cleaning sponge to remove unwanted residue from soldering for next time use
  • UL-Listed: Tested and meets independent safety standards
This 40-watt Soldering Station from Weller features a quality lightweight pencil iron and a cushioned foam grip with replaceable heating element. This product is ideal for hobbyist, DIY enthusiasts and students.The Weller WLC100 Soldering Station includes everything you need to start using solder to join metals and create efficient, electrical connections. Designed with the hobbyist and the do-it-yourself enthusiast in mind, this kit features a high-quality, lightweight pencil iron with variable

List Price: $ 55.63 Price: $ 38.37


Stahl Tools SSVT Variable Temperature Soldering Station

  • On/off switch with "power-on" indicator light showing when the iron is hot
  • Variable 302DegreeF to 842DegreeF heat setting to match specific soldering needs
  • ETL certified for safety and performance
  • Cushioned rubber grip for extended comfortable use
  • Replaceable tips provide additional functionality
Make connections that last! Stahl Tools SSVT variable temperature soldering station provides the adjustability demanded by professionals, at a price that enables anyone to solder better. Total control over a soldering iron's heat to ensure perfect electronic terminations every time, no matter the job's size. Many different soldering tasks are accomplished easily by using the SSVT's adjustable 5 to 40 watt (150DegreeC to 450DegreeC temperature) adjustment. The lightweight pencil design features a

List Price: $ 24.95 Price: $ 19.54


6 Responses to Weller WLC100 40-Watt Soldering Station

  1. Science Boy says:
    75 of 76 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Great iron if used carefully. Here are some tips (pun intended), August 11, 2011
    By 

    This review is from: Weller WLC100 40-Watt Soldering Station (Tools & Home Improvement)

    I’ve had this iron for ten years now. The level of use it’s seen has varied up and down, depending on how much time I had available to spend on my electronics hobby. The iron itself is absolutely fine for, you guessed it, hobby and DIY use (no problems with it not being ESD safe, and I’ve soldered a lot of semiconductors). If I ever need to do a higher volume of work I will upgrade to a WES-51 temp controlled station, but for now this continues to fit the bill quite nicely. The tips are long-lived if you take care of them (keep it tinned even while sitting in the holder, try not to bash it on the holder when you put it in, don’t leave it switched on if it won’t be used for a while). The standard tip is too big for electronics use and must be replaced with something smaller. For a long time I had a medium-size tip on there and it seemed to function well between 3 and 4 on the heat control, depending on the size of the work. With this station you need to pay quite careful attention to the way the solder flows when you heat the joint, if you want to produce high quality solder joints. The solder should become fully liquid and flow into and around the joint area on its own, without needing to be spread around the sides and back. If not, the temperature isn’t high enough. On the other hand, don’t set the temp higher than it needs to be or you will shorten the life of the tip and may damage the component you are working on. Remember this and you will quickly learn where the ‘normal’ setting is and when to turn the iron up or down a bit in response to larger or smaller work.

    Now for the really important information that I wanted to pass on to users of this iron:

    I was so used to using my medium size tip in this heat range that when it finally burned out and I replaced it with a fine point, I just turned the iron on and waited for it to heat up so I could tin the tip and start using it. But there was a problem: solder simply beaded on the tip and I couldn’t tin it. I thought I had a bad tip BUT here’s the kicker: heat level 3 was too high for the fine tip, so it immediately overheated and oxidized. Luckily, using fine steel wool and _very_ careful use of 600 grit paper I was able to bring the tip back to a metallic color. I then switched on the iron at its lowest heat and waited for it to heat up, regularly trying to melt solder. Eventually it got there (I had to turn it up to about 1.5) and I tinned the tip. Turns out the operating range for a fine tip is about 1.5 to 1.8 on my dial. Any higher and you can burn the tip, especially a new, untinned tip. Operating in the low power range, it takes a while for the tip to come up to temp, and to recover its temperature after soldering a few joints. This is the reason why I would go to a temp controlled station if I had to do a lot of work. If time isn’t money and you are prepared to closely monitor what’s going on at the tip, there’s no reason why you can’t make perfect solder joints with this iron.

    Another thing: often when soldering to the metal tabs in RCA connectors I had trouble getting solder to flow onto the tab. for a long time I solved this by sanding or filing the area BUT a much easier and just as effective method is simply to clean the shiny tab with a Q-tip dipped in acetone!

    Finally, please consider minimizing the lead pollution of your electronics work. Personally I don’t much like lead-free solder but I don’t want to put lead solder in the trash (ie landfill, ie groundwater). For at least the ten years I’ve had this iron, I have kept all solder waste and soldered wire clippings in a flip-top container. It takes up next to no space on the bench and I always have somewhere convenient to eject the contents of my solder sucker. At some point I will take this hazardous waste to a local electronics workshop or the municipal recycling depot, but it accumulates so slowly that it really hasn’t been an issue yet. Just make sure to mark the container “lead – do not empty in garbage” if there’s a chance that someone might do so.

    Thanks for reading, and happy soldering!

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  2. Reviewer says:
    312 of 344 people found the following review helpful
    1.0 out of 5 stars
    Bottom of the barrel, December 30, 2008
    By 

    This review is from: Weller WLC100 40-Watt Soldering Station (Tools & Home Improvement)

    For the same price one can get a “Professional” series Weller iron (like this one) with constant tip temperature, or a less known brand temperature-controlled station (like this one) that will be much nicer to work with.

    PROS:
    Weller quality and durability.

    CONS:
    Price is too high for a simple iron without temperature control, the “power control” knob works like a simple light dimmer – with no feedback from the tip, so the temperature will be jumping up and down while you work.

    ———–
    Side notes: for pleasant work experience and good quality soldering one needs to keep the proper tip temperature – it can’t be too low or too high. Note that in both extremes the solder will visibly melt, but the quality of the connection will suffer. When the iron is too cold: you are likely to get “cold solder” joints that look fine outside but lack internal integrity and often drop the connection soon. These are hard to troubleshoot.

    If the iron gets too hot, you may burn the copper traces and they will break off the PCB, you may overheat electronic parts, and (most annoying to me) you burn out the flux before it does its job. Ironically, using too hot iron may also result in “cold solder” connections. This happens because the flux will go in smoke before it reaches the soldered surfaces to clean them and make the solder stick properly and permanently.

    The only way to ensure correct soldering temperature is to use controlled iron with feedback from the tip (very important). The WLC100 has only appearance of “control” but you can’t set and hold the temperature. It is as good as the cheapest iron from Sears or Radio Shack that cost five times less.

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  3. FOX says:
    115 of 125 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    THIS IS THE ONE TO GET!, February 18, 2005
    By 
    FOX (USA) –

    Many years ago when I got this iron, it was only $30, and I see it has almost doubled in price, but STILL FAR BELOW the cost of the other Weller soldering iron stations!

    And there is really no other reason to get the other ones, when one of the elements goes bad on the other ones, you have to pay more than the price of this whole station just to replace the element! This one doesn’t have any element, you just replace the tip, which you can get at any Radio Shack for a dollar or two tops. And I still have not needed to replace the tip on this one after years of use, since I keep the tip nice and tinned.

    This heats up nice and fast, is always reliable, just as good as any of the BLUE ones that cost three and four times the cost that the same company sells, and has never let me down.

    Get it now, before they raise the price any more!

    Once you get it, it should last a lifetime.

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  4. Clint E. Jarchow says:
    36 of 36 people found the following review helpful
    4.0 out of 5 stars
    Very decent, February 17, 2010
    By 

    Amazon Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: Soldering Station Features Continuously Variable Power Between 5-40W, a 1.5mm Pointed Tip (Tools & Hardware)

    I had good luck with this soldering station. It’s a great buy for the money, especially since there are stations far more expensive. The variable temperature is nice, and it comes with a sponge as well. My only complaint is the tip size. It’s not overly big, but it’s just a little bigger than what would be ideal for me.

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  5. Old-Lumens "O-L" says:
    39 of 41 people found the following review helpful
    4.0 out of 5 stars
    Has to be worked on before using, November 20, 2011
    By 

    Amazon Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: Soldering Station Features Continuously Variable Power Between 5-40W, a 1.5mm Pointed Tip (Tools & Hardware)

    Can’t beat the price, but as in all items coming from China, there is no quality control and their standards are lower. What I mean is that this might be “UL approved” but it is unsafe as is. It has to be reworked before using it.
    .
    I had to take apart the handle (needs a special screwdriver) and correct the position of the heater element. It is not held in place, so it does not go to the end of the tip holder. That’s why these things start smoking. I took the handle apart and pushed the element all the way forward and then just used electrical tape to hold the wires from the element, to the other two wires in the lower part of the handle and put it back together. It works fine now and it heats properly. I also checked out the control box, but it was ok.
    .
    For the price, it was worth it and it will last a while now. If you go with quality, look at the OVER $100 units, that is the ONLY way to get a quality unit. I don’t have any money, so I have to use this low class stuff. If you don’t know how to work on stuff like this, buy the good stuff or don’t try it.

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  6. David Waelder says:
    82 of 92 people found the following review helpful
    3.0 out of 5 stars
    Budget priced solder station, June 12, 2010
    By 
    David Waelder (Los Angeles) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

    Amazon Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: Soldering Station Features Continuously Variable Power Between 5-40W, a 1.5mm Pointed Tip (Tools & Hardware)

    I’ve only used this soldering station once so I don’t yet have depth of experience with it. So far it has functioned very nicely for me.

    I’ve read other reviews of this, or a similar, product and heard some complaints of quality control issues. One reviewer mentioned that smoke poured from the iron when he first turned it on. I had no problems. It did smoke a bit when I first plugged it in and before I successfully tinned the iron. Perhaps heat dissipation is not effective until the iron is tinned. Anyway, it worked perfectly once the iron was tinned and it was very nice, in a inexpensive iron, to have temperature control to match the work being done. Construction quality appears to be quite good – better than the price would suggest. Of course, I can’t see inside the housing but all the components are tight, the cable to the iron is heavy duty, the protective insulation on the iron is secure and functional. In short, it’s better than one would expect from the price.

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